Be Eager To Prophesy

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Hebrews 4:12–13 NIV
For the word of God is alive and active. Sharper than any double-edged sword, it penetrates even to dividing soul and spirit, joints and marrow; it judges the thoughts and attitudes of the heart. Nothing in all creation is hidden from God’s sight. Everything is uncovered and laid bare before the eyes of him to whom we must give account.
1 John 1:1–4 NIV
That which was from the beginning, which we have heard, which we have seen with our eyes, which we have looked at and our hands have touched—this we proclaim concerning the Word of life. The life appeared; we have seen it and testify to it, and we proclaim to you the eternal life, which was with the Father and has appeared to us. We proclaim to you what we have seen and heard, so that you also may have fellowship with us. And our fellowship is with the Father and with his Son, Jesus Christ. We write this to make our joy complete.
Deuteronomy 11:18–21 NIV
Fix these words of mine in your hearts and minds; tie them as symbols on your hands and bind them on your foreheads. Teach them to your children, talking about them when you sit at home and when you walk along the road, when you lie down and when you get up. Write them on the doorframes of your houses and on your gates, so that your days and the days of your children may be many in the land the Lord swore to give your ancestors, as many as the days that the heavens are above the earth.
Deuteronomy 31:24–29 NIV
After Moses finished writing in a book the words of this law from beginning to end, he gave this command to the Levites who carried the ark of the covenant of the Lord: “Take this Book of the Law and place it beside the ark of the covenant of the Lord your God. There it will remain as a witness against you. For I know how rebellious and stiff-necked you are. If you have been rebellious against the Lord while I am still alive and with you, how much more will you rebel after I die! Assemble before me all the elders of your tribes and all your officials, so that I can speak these words in their hearing and call the heavens and the earth to testify against them. For I know that after my death you are sure to become utterly corrupt and to turn from the way I have commanded you. In days to come, disaster will fall on you because you will do evil in the sight of the Lord and arouse his anger by what your hands have made.”
1 corinthians 14
1 Corinthians 14:1–19 NIV
1 Follow the way of love and eagerly desire gifts of the Spirit, especially prophecy. 2 For anyone who speaks in a tongue does not speak to people but to God. Indeed, no one understands them; they utter mysteries by the Spirit. 3 But the one who prophesies speaks to people for their strengthening, encouraging and comfort. 4 Anyone who speaks in a tongue edifies themselves, but the one who prophesies edifies the church. 5 I would like every one of you to speak in tongues, but I would rather have you prophesy. The one who prophesies is greater than the one who speaks in tongues, unless someone interprets, so that the church may be edified. 6 Now, brothers and sisters, if I come to you and speak in tongues, what good will I be to you, unless I bring you some revelation or knowledge or prophecy or word of instruction? 7 Even in the case of lifeless things that make sounds, such as the pipe or harp, how will anyone know what tune is being played unless there is a distinction in the notes? 8 Again, if the trumpet does not sound a clear call, who will get ready for battle? 9 So it is with you. Unless you speak intelligible words with your tongue, how will anyone know what you are saying? You will just be speaking into the air. 10 Undoubtedly there are all sorts of languages in the world, yet none of them is without meaning. 11 If then I do not grasp the meaning of what someone is saying, I am a foreigner to the speaker, and the speaker is a foreigner to me. 12 So it is with you. Since you are eager for gifts of the Spirit, try to excel in those that build up the church. 13 For this reason the one who speaks in a tongue should pray that they may interpret what they say. 14 For if I pray in a tongue, my spirit prays, but my mind is unfruitful. 15 So what shall I do? I will pray with my spirit, but I will also pray with my understanding; I will sing with my spirit, but I will also sing with my understanding. 16 Otherwise when you are praising God in the Spirit, how can someone else, who is now put in the position of an inquirer, say “Amen” to your thanksgiving, since they do not know what you are saying? 17 You are giving thanks well enough, but no one else is edified. 18 I thank God that I speak in tongues more than all of you. 19 But in the church I would rather speak five intelligible words to instruct others than ten thousand words in a tongue.
1 John 1:1–4 NIV
That which was from the beginning, which we have heard, which we have seen with our eyes, which we have looked at and our hands have touched—this we proclaim concerning the Word of life. The life appeared; we have seen it and testify to it, and we proclaim to you the eternal life, which was with the Father and has appeared to us. We proclaim to you what we have seen and heard, so that you also may have fellowship with us. And our fellowship is with the Father and with his Son, Jesus Christ. We write this to make our joy complete.
1 Corinthians 14:1–12 NIV
1 Follow the way of love and eagerly desire gifts of the Spirit, especially prophecy. 2 For anyone who speaks in a tongue does not speak to people but to God. Indeed, no one understands them; they utter mysteries by the Spirit. 3 But the one who prophesies speaks to people for their strengthening, encouraging and comfort. 4 Anyone who speaks in a tongue edifies themselves, but the one who prophesies edifies the church. 5 I would like every one of you to speak in tongues, but I would rather have you prophesy. The one who prophesies is greater than the one who speaks in tongues, unless someone interprets, so that the church may be edified. 6 Now, brothers and sisters, if I come to you and speak in tongues, what good will I be to you, unless I bring you some revelation or knowledge or prophecy or word of instruction? 7 Even in the case of lifeless things that make sounds, such as the pipe or harp, how will anyone know what tune is being played unless there is a distinction in the notes? 8 Again, if the trumpet does not sound a clear call, who will get ready for battle? 9 So it is with you. Unless you speak intelligible words with your tongue, how will anyone know what you are saying? You will just be speaking into the air. 10 Undoubtedly there are all sorts of languages in the world, yet none of them is without meaning. 11 If then I do not grasp the meaning of what someone is saying, I am a foreigner to the speaker, and the speaker is a foreigner to me. 12 So it is with you. Since you are eager for gifts of the Spirit, try to excel in those that build up the church.
introduction
read scripture passage in greek. Do u know what i am reading on? it is then useless, the most is to prove that i am smart, can speak Greek.
it is useless even if it is a strong message, because it makes no sense at all to you.
This chapter is very difficult to understand because it deals with a phenomenon which, for most of us, is outside our experience. Throughout this passage, Paul sets two spiritual gifts in comparison with each other. First, there is speaking with tongues. This phenomenon was very common in the early Church. People became worked up to a state of ecstasy and poured out a quite uncontrollable torrent of sounds in no known language. Unless these sounds were interpreted, no one had any idea what they meant. Strange as it may seem to many of us, in the early Church this was a highly coveted gift. It was dangerous. For one thing, it was abnormal and was greatly admired, and therefore the person who possessed it was very liable to develop a certain spiritual pride; and for another thing, the very desire to possess it produced, at least in some, a kind of self-hypnotism and deliberately induced hysteria which resulted in a completely false and manufactured speaking with tongues. Over against this speaking with tongues, Paul sets the gift of prophecy. In the translation, we have not used the word prophecy, for that would have further complicated an already complicated situation. In this case, and in fact usually, it has nothing to do with foretelling the future but everything to do with forthtelling the will and the message of God. We have already said that preaching very nearly gives the meaning, but in this case we have kept the literal meaning and have translated it as forthtelling.
Over against this speaking with tongues, Paul sets the gift of prophecy. In the translation, we have not used the word prophecy, for that would have further complicated an already complicated situation. In this case, and in fact usually, it has nothing to do with foretelling the future but everything to do with forthtelling the will and the message of God. We have already said that preaching very nearly gives the meaning, but in this case we have kept the literal meaning and have translated it as forthtelling.
Barclay, W. (2002). The Letters to the Corinthians (3rd ed., p. 150). Louisville, KY; London: Westminster John Knox Press.
prophesy is far more greater than speaking in tongue. what is prophesy? Spiritual utterance. Not foretelling of the future, but ....proclaiming the truth with clarity, so that everyone have access to the knowledge and love of God.
to prophesy is to perform intelligible, articulate, communicative acts of speech which have a positive effect on others and, in turn, on the whole community. prophecy amounts to healthy preaching, proclamation, or teaching which is pastorally applied for the appropriation of gospel truth and gospel promise, in their own context of situation, to help others.
to prophesy is to perform intelligible, articulate, communicative acts of speech which have a positive effect on others and, in turn, on the whole community
We must not think of a New Testament prophet as a person who foretold the future, for even the Old Testament prophets did more than that. Prophets received God’s message immediately, through the Holy Spirit, and communicated that message to the church
We must not think of a New Testament prophet as a person who foretold the future, for even the Old Testament prophets did more than that. Prophets received God’s message immediately, through the Holy Spirit, and communicated that message to the church
Wiersbe, W. W. (1996). The Bible exposition commentary (Vol. 1, p. 612). Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.
Paul understands his own commission to preach the apostolic gospel to the Gentiles in prophetic terms. the term prophet denoted a wide range of leadership activities: the famous hymn in honor of leaders which begins “let us now sing the praises of famous men …” () includes Moses, Nathan, Elijah, Zerubbabel, and others who by their intelligible communicative action lead the people to give praise to God for his saving acts (). Paul himself, Sandnes insists, stands in this prophetic tradition.
This is something like our preaching, but it is not identical with it. It is not the delivery of a carefully prepared sermon, but the uttering of words directly inspired by God. The New Testament draws clear distinctions between preaching, teaching and prophecy.
It has often been equated with preaching, or with the kind of preaching which teaches biblical truth, notably expository preaching. ‘The gift of prophesying … is basically the explanation of the present in the light of the revelation of God. The closest term we would call it by today is “expository preaching”, unfolding the mind of God and applying it to the daily struggles of life. The New Testament draws clear distinctions between preaching, teaching and prophecy.
‘a word from the Lord through a member of his body, inspired by his Spirit and given to build up the rest of the body.’ the gift of prophecy is to be distinguished from the office and ministry of a prophet. Testimony to Jesus is ‘the spirit of prophecy’—a testimony which is prospective in the Old Testament and retrospective in the New.
Thiselton, A. C. (2000). The First Epistle to the Corinthians: a commentary on the Greek text (p. 1084). Grand Rapids, MI: W.B. Eerdmans.
important to ourselves: it is a Gift of the spirit for everyone (v1 & 5)
pursue earnestly and with eager (v1). the word pursue is like in the case of a hunter chasing after prey. it is a present tesne, signifying the continuing of an action already begun. the intention is out of love and for love sake - love for the others.
Be eager for permits a corporate concern for the well-being of the community, i.e., that these gifts may operate in the church, which is Paul’s horizon of concern. By contrast, NIV’s eagerly desire suggests a more individualist concern which Paul does not encourage
Thiselton, A. C. (2000). The First Epistle to the Corinthians: a commentary on the Greek text (p. 1082). Grand Rapids, MI: W.B. Eerdmans.
it starts with love, which is Paul’s position that is summed up in his opening words. As he has stressed throughout chapter 13, the most important thing is the pursuit of love. the display of love is to eagerly desire the gift of prophecy and bring benefits to others.
n important principle to follow is sketched by Paul himself, when he both stresses the special value of prophecy and wants every Christian at Corinth to use it. It is presumably a gift which at the same time uniquely strengthens the church and is accessible to any member. At the same time, we must not trivialize it in our attempts to understand it, nor must we make it so specialized that it lies beyond the reach of most Christians. A church in which everybody is an expository preacher (or any kind of preacher, for that matter) would be a nightmare, and is manifestly not what Paul wants for the Corinthians. Equally, it is very easy to empty the gift of prophecy of its unique, immediate and distinctive content. It then becomes nothing more than sanctified common sense
How can we receive this gift? . Firstly, the way of life through which God inspires a person with the gift of prophecy is clearly delineated in the passage from Isaiah. The daily discipline of spending time with God, in order to listen to him and to hear his word, is fundamental to any authentic prophetic gift. Because every Christian is duty bound to discover and pursue that discipline which most effectively maintains personal contact with the Lord, therefore the fruits of such a devotional life (in terms of receiving a word from God for others) are available to every Christian. Secondly, the emphasis in is on the strength and support which such a ministry will bring to ‘him that is weary’—a perspective which Paul himself underlines in this chapter (14:3). Thirdly, the latter part of the passage stresses the need for both an open heart and a thick skin: open to God and impervious to opposition. It is clear from all sides that those who genuinely receive a prophetic gift need great courage and resilience in bringing it faithfully to the church. There may be hostility, even rejection. This passage from Isaiah encourages us, therefore, to expect special insight to be given by God to any sensitive and obedient believer: insight into God’s will for a specific situation, or into the application of God’s word to the times in which we live. Such prophetic insight does not have the inherent and permanent authority of those prophets who, with the apostles of Christ, provided the foundation of the church. But continuing prophetic ministry is essential today if the church is not going to settle down into a comfortable conformity to contemporary culture.
the tongue of those who are taught,
that I may know how to sustain with a word
him that is weary.
Morning by morning he wakens,
he wakens my ear
to hear as those who are taught.
The Lord God has opened my ear,
Paul says both pursuing love and desiring gifts together. that is to say that, love is superior to all endowments. the love here refers to compassion, sympathy and benevolence. whatever endowment you may possess or desire, do not neglec the cultivation of love. love must be the motivator in exercising the gifts.
and I was not rebellious,
I turned not backward.
I gave my back to the smiters,
desire spiritual gifts like how u desire for wealth and health. Many religious persons go into the contrary extreme: they call gifts dangerous, ignore them, sneer at them, and say they are of the world. No, says the apostle, ‘desire’ them, look them in the face as goods; not the highest goods, but still desirable, like wealth or health. Of gifts, Paul prefers those which are useful to those that are showy. The gift of prophecy was useful to others, whilst that of tongues was only a luxury for self
and my cheeks to those who pulled out the beard;
For while all of the gifts are desirable, the “gift of prophecy” builds up or edifies the church to a greater extent than any other, and, in contrast to some at Corinth who thought otherwise, on this basis it is to be given priority over the exercise of the gift of speech in tongues.
Spence-Jones, H. D. M. (Ed.). (1909). 1 Corinthians (p. 462). London; New York: Funk & Wagnalls Company.
Many religious persons go into the contrary extreme: they call gifts dangerous, ignore them, sneer at them, and say they are of the world. No, says the apostle, ‘desire’ them, look them in the face as goods; not the highest goods, but still desirable, like wealth or health
I hid not my face
Paul does not deny that the gift of tongues exists. Nor can anyone say that with him it is a case of sour grapes, for he possesses the gift more than anyone else does; but he insists that, to be of value, any gift must benefit the whole congregation
from shame and spitting.
important to believers: it brings spiritual benefits to others (v3-4)
strengthening/edification, encouragement/exhortation and comfort/consolation
service of other, not for self-affirmation as compared to the gifts of speaking in tongue. effect of authentic prophesying is (i) to build up the whole community (vv. 4, 5, 17; cf. 8:1, 10; 10:23); (ii) to exhort or to comfort (vv. 3 and 31; cf. 4:13, 16; 16:12, 15); and (iii) to console or to encourage (v. 3; cf. ; see introduction to 14:1–40, above); which is different from self-sufficient indulgent religiosity which provides mainly individual satisfaction.
prophecy entails building, encouragement, promise, or a declaration of the deeds of God in a pastoral context
strengthening/edifying (building up) - build and plant () - lay a foundation like a skilled master builder. The major concern on Paul’s heart throughout this chapter is the edification of the church at Corinth: the word comes seven times. build up the body of Christ - the temple of the living God. The mistake the Corinthians were making was to emphasize their own personal edification to the neglect of the church. They wanted to build themselves up, but they did not want to build up their fellow believers. This attitude, of course, not only hurt the other Christians, but it also hurt the believers who were practicing it. After all, if we are all members of the same body, the way we relate to the other members must ultimately affect us personally. Paul detected that the church was neglecting prophecy and giving a wrong emphasis to tongues. A person is built up when he finds out the answer to disputed points. to increase people’s knowledge of Christian truth and their ability to live the Christian life
Since you are so eager to have the special abilitiesthe Spirit gives, seek those that will strengthenthe whole church. Paul does not deny that ‘tongues’ have a value for edification. But (unless interpreted) they profit only the person who exercises the gift, whereas he who prophesies builds up the whole church (v4). There can be no doubting which of the two acts is done in love.
Bray, G. L. (Ed.). (1999). 1–2 Corinthians (p. 138). Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press.
Wiersbe, W. W. (1996). The Bible exposition commentary (Vol. 1, p. 612). Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.
Wiersbe, W. W. (1996). The Bible exposition commentary (Vol. 1, p. 612). Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.
Barclay, W. (2002). The Letters to the Corinthians (3rd ed., p. 152). Louisville, KY; London: Westminster John Knox Press.
He would like to see all the Corinthians speak with ‘tongues’. Consistently he refuses to speak disparagingly of this gift. But even more would he wish to see everybody prophesying. The person prophesying is greater than the speaker in ‘tongues’ (would the Corinthians have put it the other way round?). The spectacular character of speaking in ‘tongues’ seems to have appealed to the Corinthians, but Paul roundly asserts the superiority of prophecy, unless there is interpretation. If ‘tongues’ are interpreted the hearers are edified, and there is no great difference from prophecy. Both are inspired speech, and both now convey a message to people.
encouraging or exhorting/challenging - multi form character of the word if we are to understand the nature of prophecy and prophetic preaching in Pauline Theology. It is not the bland communication of information as such, but a varied range of illocutionary speech-acts which plead, exhort, encourage, challenge, brace, console, or provide comfort on the basis of “institutional facts”. It denotes one who speaks in God’s name and probes the secrets of hearts. In every group of people, there are those who are depressed and discouraged. Dreams will not come true; effort seems to have achieved so little; self-examination serves to show nothing but failures and inadequacies. Within the Christian fellowship, everyone should find something to cheer the heart and give strength for action
In every group of people, there are those who are depressed and discouraged. Dreams will not come true; effort seems to have achieved so little; self-examination serves to show nothing but failures and inadequacies. Within the Christian fellowship, everyone should find something to cheer the heart and give strength for action
encouraging or exhorting/challenging - multi form character of the word if we are to understand the nature of prophecy and prophetic preaching in Pauline Theology. It is not the bland communication of information as such, but a varied range of illocutionary speech-acts which plead, exhort, encourage, challenge, brace, console, or provide comfort on the basis of “institutional facts”. It denotes one who speaks in God’s name and probes the secrets of hearts.
Barclay, W. (2002). The Letters to the Corinthians (3rd ed., p. 152). Louisville, KY; London: Westminster John Knox Press.
Comforting - the term closely related with the attitude and activity of pastoral care. suggest the bracing, strengthening, supportive activity. caution that while exhortation and persuasion would not be swept aside, sensitivity to the variety of individual personal circumstances for which support is required must be addressed by a close personal understanding of these varied and specific situations. The everyday life of the church at Thessalonica, Malherbe concludes, “required comfort … from the earliest days of the church’s existence,” and the complementary activities of warning and comforting form part of the pastoral process of “nurturing communal relationships.” In any group of people, there will always be some whom life has hurt; and within the Christian fellowship they must be able to find ‘beauty for their ashes, the oil of joy for mourning and the garment of praise for the spirit of their heaviness’
In any group of people, there will always be some whom life has hurt; and within the Christian fellowship they must be able to find ‘beauty for their ashes, the oil of joy for mourning and the garment of praise for the spirit of their heaviness’
Barclay, W. (2002). The Letters to the Corinthians (3rd ed., p. 152). Louisville, KY; London: Westminster John Knox Press.
How have you been built, stregnthen, and comforted by someone? What has this person done? it might be just a simple word, which u can understand.
Do you aim to build up, to encourage, and to comfort others with what u say?
Prophecy was best because it built up the church. It gave the listeners encouragement and comfort—something that everybody needs. It is also unfortunate that people have the idea that tongues were used to preach the Gospel to the lost. Quite the contrary was true: Paul was afraid that the excessive tongues-speaking in the church would convince the lost that the Christians were crazy!
Paul begins by declaring that tongues are addressed to God and not to men and women, for human beings cannot understand them. If people exercise this gift of tongues, they may be enriching their own spiritual experience, but they are certainly not enriching the souls of the congregation, because to others it is unintelligible. On the other hand, the gift of forthtelling the truth produces something which everyone can understand and which is spiritually beneficial to all.
Paul declares that tongues are addressed to God and not to men and women, for human beings cannot understand them. If people exercise this gift of tongues, they may be enriching their own spiritual experience, but they are certainly not enriching the souls of the congregation, because to others it is unintelligible. On the other hand, the gift of forthtelling the truth produces something which everyone can understand and which is spiritually beneficial to all.
Wiersbe, W. W. (1996). The Bible exposition commentary (Vol. 1, p. 612). Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.
It builds the church (v4, 12).
Since you are so eager to have the special abilitiesthe Spirit gives, seek those that will strengthenthe whole church. Paul does not deny that ‘tongues’ have a value for edification. But (unless interpreted) they profit only the person who exercises the gift, whereas he who prophesies builds up the whole church (v4). There can be no doubting which of the two acts is done in love.
He would like to see all the Corinthians speak with ‘tongues’. Consistently he refuses to speak disparagingly of this gift. But even more would he wish to see everybody prophesying. The person prophesying is greater than the speaker in ‘tongues’ (would the Corinthians have put it the other way round?). The spectacular character of speaking in ‘tongues’ seems to have appealed to the Corinthians, but Paul roundly asserts the superiority of prophecy, unless there is interpretation. If ‘tongues’ are interpreted the hearers are edified, and there is no great difference from prophecy. Both are inspired speech, and both now convey a message to people.
it is important for Paul to build the church through the worship of a local church. the worship of a local church has an indispensable role in building up the faith and the discipleship of its members. When it is vital, participatory, expectant and attractive (the root meaning of the word translated ‘decently’ in verse 40), the whole congregation grows strong and steady in the Lord.
imporatant to unbeliever: It brings understanding and manifest intelligibility - revelation and knowledge and instruction (v6)
Think, friends: If I come to you and all I do is pray privately to God in a way only he can understand, what are you going to get out of that? IfI don’t addressyou plainly withsome insight or truth or proclamation or teaching, what help am I to you? THis contrast to the speaking in tongue. The speech is not a communication of wisdom to others, but a mysterious activity that exalts the speaker above the ordinary sphere of self-consciousness and is ecstatic. “No man understandeth him.” There is the outward hearing on man’s part, but no inward hearing. God is the only listener who comprehends him
Spence-Jones, H. D. M. (Ed.). (1909). 1 Corinthians (p. 465). London; New York: Funk & Wagnalls Company.
v9 MSG So if you speak in a way no one can understand, what’s the point of opening your mouth? the church is built and sustained through the communicative word of the gospel of the cross and resurrection and its many entailments, promises and directives
the background and the substance of prophecy:
The Letters to the Corinthians The False and the True Worship (1 Corinthians 14:1–19)

It comes from a direct revelation from God. We cannot speak to others unless God has first spoken to us. It was said of a great preacher that, time after time, he paused as if listening for a voice. We never give to one another or to scholars truth which we have produced, or even discovered; we transmit truth which has been given to us.

It comes from a direct revelation from God. We cannot speak to others unless God has first spoken to us. It was said of a great preacher that, time after time, he paused as if listening for a voice. We never give to one another or to scholars truth which we have produced, or even discovered; we transmit truth which has been given to us.
It comes from a direct revelation from God. We cannot speak to others unless God has first spoken to us. It was said of a great preacher that, time after time, he paused as if listening for a voice. We never give to one another or to scholars truth which we have produced, or even discovered; we transmit truth which has been given to us.
It may bring some special knowledge. We cannot possibly be experts in everything, but each of us has special knowledge of something. It has been said that anyone can write an interesting book. We could all do it if we simply set down completely honestly all that has happened to us. The experiences of life give something special to each one of us, and the most effective preaching is simply witness to what we have found to be true
It consists of forthtelling the truth. In the early Church, the first preaching given to any fellowship was a simple proclamation of the facts of the Christian story. Certain things are beyond argument. ‘Tell me of your certainties,’ said the German poet Goethe, ‘I have doubts enough of my own.’ However we may finish, it is a good thing to begin with the facts of Christ. (4) It goes on to teaching. There comes a time when the question has to be asked: ‘What is the meaning of these facts?’ Simply because we are thinking creatures, religion implies theology. And it may well be that the faith of many people collapses and the loyalty of many people grows cold because they have not thought things out and thought them through.
It consists of forthtelling the truth. In the early Church, the first preaching given to any fellowship was a simple proclamation of the facts of the Christian story. Certain things are beyond argument. ‘Tell me of your certainties,’ said the German poet Goethe, ‘I have doubts enough of my own.’ However we may finish, it is a good thing to begin with the facts of Christ. (4) It goes on to teaching. There comes a time when the question has to be asked: ‘What is the meaning of these facts?’ Simply because we are thinking creatures, religion implies theology. And it may well be that the faith of many people collapses and the loyalty of many people grows cold because they have not thought things out and thought them through.
in verses 6-12, Paul uses four example to emphasize the uselessness of unintelligle noise.
first, by a picture of his arrival at Corinth. - teaching. if he came speaking with tongues, what use would that be? They would have no idea what he was talking about
Second, of a melody in which varied pitch becomes confused and hence unrecognized. - Worship. If it obeys the normal laws of harmony, it can produce a melody; but, if it does not, it produces simply a chaos of sound
Barclay, W. (2002). The Letters to the Corinthians (3rd ed., p. 151). Louisville, KY; London: Westminster John Knox Press.
Barclay, W. (2002). The Letters to the Corinthians (3rd ed., p. 151). Louisville, KY; London: Westminster John Knox Press.
third, the bugle sound where rhythm and/or pitch is so unintelligible as a signal that it cannot promote appropriate action. - war. If it plays the correct call, it can summon fighting men to advance, to retreat, to sleep and to wake. But if it produces simply a medley of meaningless sound, no one knows what to do
Barclay, W. (2002). The Letters to the Corinthians (3rd ed., p. 151). Louisville, KY; London: Westminster John Knox Press.
fourth example is the experience of language barriers. are we making unintelligle noise? What are the noises that we are making? as long as it is not understood by others, not building up with love. - communication
intelligible VS unintelligible. To speak words that have no significancy to those who hear them is to leave them ignorant of what is spoken; it is speaking to the air, v. 9. Words without a meaning can convey no notion nor instruction to the mind; and words not understood have no meaning with those who do not understand them: to talk to them in such language is to waste our breath
Paul emphasized the importance of doctrinal teaching in the church. Our worship must be based on truth, or it may become superstitious emotionalism. Christians need to know what they believe and why they believe it. The prophet shared truth with the church, and thereby edified the assembly. The person speaking in tongues (unless there is an interpreter) is enjoying his worship of God, but he is not edifying the church.
Paul emphasized the importance of doctrinal teaching in the church. Our worship must be based on truth, or it may become superstitious emotionalism. Christians need to know what they believe and why they believe it. The prophet shared truth with the church, and thereby edified the assembly. The person speaking in tongues (unless there is an interpreter) is enjoying his worship of God, but he is not edifying the church.
it should display order (vv. 26–40) so that all believers are built up and the unbeliever present in the assembly is challenged by the gospel, convicted, and converted (vv. 21–25)
it should display order (vv. 26–40) so that all believers are built up and the unbeliever present in the assembly is challenged by the gospel, convicted, and converted (vv. 21–25)
To speak words that have no significancy to those who hear them is to leave them ignorant of what is spoken; it is speaking to the air, v. 9. Words without a meaning can convey no notion nor instruction to the mind; and words not understood have no meaning with those who do not understand them: to talk to them in such language is to waste our breath
Since you are so eager to have the special abilitiesthe Spirit gives, seek those that will strengthenthe whole church. Paul does not deny that ‘tongues’ have a value for edification. But (unless interpreted) they profit only the person who exercises the gift, whereas he who prophesies builds up the whole church (v4). There can be no doubting which of the two acts is done in love.
He would like to see all the Corinthians speak with ‘tongues’. Consistently he refuses to speak disparagingly of this gift. But even more would he wish to see everybody prophesying. The person prophesying is greater than the speaker in ‘tongues’ (would the Corinthians have put it the other way round?). The spectacular character of speaking in ‘tongues’ seems to have appealed to the Corinthians, but Paul roundly asserts the superiority of prophecy, unless there is interpretation. If ‘tongues’ are interpreted the hearers are edified, and there is no great difference from prophecy. Both are inspired speech, and both now convey a message to people.
Conclusion
my journey in asking for speaking in tongue.
everyone can prophesy - when we speak for God, you are prophesying.
Christian Literature Sunday
v18-19; 24;
v40 - everything should be done in a fitting and orderly way.
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