1 John 2:25-29

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Observations:

v. 25, Transitioning from the promise of abiding in the Son and the Father, John speaks on the benefit rooted in the manifestation of hesed, eternal life.
v. 26, John is apparently writing his audience due to his concern towards the antichrists plaguing this church
THE PHRASING ON THIS VERSE IS AWKWARD
v. 27, in light of what John had mentioned in v. 20, the Holy Spirit teaches us the truth of Christ; as we are grow in knowledge of Him, we abide in Him
WHAT DOES THIS VERSE MEAN!
v. 28-29, John calls upon Christians to abide on Him, giving an eschatological reason (Christ’s return); because we know that Christ is righteous, we too must walk as He walked (v. 6)

Intro:

Recap on last week
Antichrists
Guarding ourselves from false teaching and false theology
Read 1 John 2:25-29

Head- What does it mean?

(10-15 min.)
v. 25-26
v. 25, Upon this premise of abiding in God, we have the promise of eternal life.
This is the only use of the word “promise” in the Johannine writings. It is a term used especially to refer to the prophetic elements in the Old Testament which make promises that have already been fulfilled or are sure to find fulfilment. Elsewhere in the New Testament, especially in the Pastoral Epistles, we hear of the promise of life (1 Tim. 4:8; 2 Tim. 1:1), and this is said to have been promised by God (Tit. 1:2; Jas. 1:12). The thought is of the eternal life of heaven which is promised by God to those who serve him faithfully in this life. Here, however, the promise is probably traced back to Jesus himself (Jn. 10:10, 28).
v. 26
“I am writing” is literally “I wrote,” and refers back to verses 18–25. There is, however, a new element in the summary. John describes the heretics as “those who are trying to lead you astray”
Previously he described them simply as opponents of Christ and purveyors of falsehood. Now he brings out what was implicit in his earlier description: the heretics were trying to lead the faithful members of the church astray also.
It was not enough for the readers to recognize that there were heretics around; it was vital for them to realize that the heretics constituted a danger to themselves.
v. 27
v. 27, in light of what John had mentioned in v. 20, the Holy Spirit teaches us the truth of Christ; as we are grow in knowledge of Him, we abide in Him
The anointing here is the Spirit who comes to teach believers and to guide them into all truth.
R. Schnackenburg has observed how what is said here in 1 John about the anointing is paralleled by what is said in John 14:17; 15:26; 16:13 about the activity of the Paraclete, the Holy Spirit. In the same way Paul describes the work of God in the believer: “He anointed us, set his seal of ownership on us, and put his Spirit in our hearts as a deposit, guaranteeing what is to come”
We are called to let the Word of God abide in us (v. 24), this requires action; now we are told that His anointing does the job of teaching
John appears to be saying rather that they do not need instruction from teachers such as himself—and yet this is precisely what he gives them!
This is an interesting paradox, which may shed some light on the fact that John also tells his readers that those born of God cannot sin and at the same time exhorts them not to sin.
In the present case, two points may clarify what he means.
On the one hand, Schnackenburg stresses that the instruction given by church teachers must be accompanied by inner teaching by the Spirit which enables the hearers to sift out and accept what is true.
On the other hand, Bruce comments that the Spirit’s instruction comes through teachers who themselves possess the anointing; Christians possessed by the Spirit give one another mutual instruction, without which no single individual can appreciate the whole of God’s truth (Eph. 3:18)
What cannot be deduced is that John is saying you don’t need teachers or preachers to teach and preach unto you the Word of God.
v. 28-29
v. 28, John calls upon Christians to abide on Him, giving an eschatological reason (Christ’s return)
The Christian identity gives us confidence
Not in ourselves, but in the promises of God
v. 29, because we know that Christ is righteous, we too must walk as He walked (v. 6)
The truth that we have come to know and are continuing to grow in should affect the way we live, for righteousness, in testimony of our new birth in Christ.

Heart- Do I buy it?

(20-30 min)
Is there anything in this passage that is challenging you?
Do we need commentaries? Do we need extrabiblical resources? Do we need preachers and teachers?
Again John brings up abiding and practicing righteousness; what is the connection?
What is the connection between His promise and our confidence?

Hands- So What? How then should I live?

(10-15 min)
Walk with God: What does confidence in the promises of God look like personally in your walk with God?
Keep Christ first: What does confidence in the promises of God look like personally when we keep Christ first?
Keep sin out of your life: What does confidence in the promises of God look like personally when you are keeping sin out of your life?
Personally, when the promises of God are at the forefront of my mind, I find that a hidden strength to flee temptation; I find that there is a hidden hope to cleanses away my fears; I remember that an identity in Christ is not without purpose
When I meditate upon the hesed of God, I am filled with joy, satisfaction, zeal to love God and my neighbor
Must be cultivated daily, Psalm 1
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